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Patagonia Provisions’ New Fusilli Is Ecofriendly, But How Does It Taste?

Patagonia Provisions’ New Fusilli Is Ecofriendly, But How Does It Taste?


Patagonia Provisions’ new fusilli has everything a climate scientist could ask for in a corkscrew-shaped pasta: local and sustainable sourcing. Organic, B Corp, and 1% for the Planet certification. The flour is milled in the Midwest, and, of course, the box it comes in — like the fleece jackets the outdoor-gear juggernaut is famous for — is made from 100 percent recyclable material. What really sets the stuff apart from Ronzoni, though, is that it’s the first commercial pasta that incorporates Kernza, a domesticated variety of perennial wild wheatgrass developed in the 1970s by plant breeders at the Land Institute in Salina, Kansas. (The trademarked term combines “kern” from kernel with “za” from Konza, an alternative spelling for the Native American people after whom Kansas is named.) Commonly consumed flour is milled from annual grains that are sown each year, requiring tilling that disrupts the soil and releases carbon. Perennials like Kernza, however, stay put and stick around. The plant’s deep root system (typically 12 feet long versus annual wheat’s four) prevents erosion, draws down carbon, nourishes the soil, and increases water absorption. In other words, it’s a bit of an environment-friendly miracle worker.



Read More at: Grub Street

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